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Anesthesia and epidural analgesia for “heroic” cancer surgery.

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Subacromial Balloon Spacer for Massive Irreparable Rotator Cuff Tears.

Massive irreparable rotator cuff tears (MIRCTs) represent 10% to 40% of cases of rotator cuff abnormality and are challenging to treat. When MIRCTs are unresponsive to nonoperative treatment, surgery may be considered. An arthroscopically inserted biodegradable subacromial balloon spacer (InSpace; Stryker) has grown in popularity in recent years for treatment of patients with MIRCTs. The balloon spacer is made of a copolymer of poly-L-lactide-eco-ε-caprolactone and is expected to fully resorb within 12 months after implantation. Research has suggested the balloon spacer becomes progressively compressed and is slowly replaced with fibrous tissue between the humeral head and the acromion, which may support a prolonged benefit following resorption. Clinical benefits may be achieved through reduced acromiohumeral abutment and subacromial friction during shoulder movement by lowering the humeral head and facilitating humeral gliding. The primary population indicated for use of the implant are patients older than 40 years with persistent shoulder pain and functional disability due to MIRCTs. Contraindications include irreparable subscapularis tears, moderate to severe arthritis, axillary nerve palsy, and known allergy to the implant material. There are not clear indications for use of the implant for treatment of partial-thickness tears or repairable complete rotator cuff tears. Familiari et al. reported that treatment with the balloon spacer was associated with a significant improvement in shoulder function, limited need for revision surgery, and high satisfaction at mean 3-year follow-up. More recently, a prospective multicenter randomized controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the balloon spacer in 93 patients compared to 91 patients undergoing arthroscopic partial repair. Significant and clinically relevant improvements in the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score from baseline were noted in both groups up to the 2-year follow-up.

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Editorial Commentary: Minimizing Traction Force and Time as Well as Application of Specific Technical Pearls Might Trump the Importance of Choosing Between Post or Postless Hip Arthroscopy With Regards to Complications.

Recently, there has been a trend toward performing hip arthroscopy without a post (postless) in an effort to decrease perineal post-related complications. Previous studies have revealed a variable risk of pudendal nerve neuralgia and perineal soft-tissue injury when using a post. There is emerging evidence that arthroscopic hip procedures can be done without the use of a post, with less traction force on the perineal region, and with adequate exposure to safely accomplish a well-done femoroacetabular impingement corrective procedure. Prospective comparative studies with conclusive evidence of the superiority of either technique, however, are lacking. Complications with a post are likely associated with high traction forces, prolonged traction times, and potentially suboptimal technique and patient positioning. In addition, postless traction is in its infancy and new adverse events/outcomes are likely to emerge. There are likely specific situations and patient populations in which one technique might be superior to the other. We are the carpenters of medicine and rather than blaming our tools and throwing out a technique that has served us well for decades, we should better understand some important pearls and pitfalls that might allow either method to be safely performed.

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Development and psychometric validation of a patient-reported outcome measure of recurrent urinary tract infection impact: the Recurrent UTI Impact Questionnaire.

Recurrent urinary tract infection (rUTI) is a highly prevalent condition associated with significant poor quality of life outcomes. A patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) of rUTI-associated psychosocial impact is urgently required to supplement clinical evaluation and validate the challenges experienced by patients. This study therefore developed and validated the Recurrent UTI Impact Questionnaire (RUTIIQ).

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Quantitative Sensory Changes Following Posterior Spinal Fusion to Treat Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis.

Sensory changes surrounding the incision frequently develop after posterior spinal fusion (PSF) to treat adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Anecdotally, patients may experience sensory changes on the chest wall. Such postsurgical sensory changes are not well described quantitatively. This study aims to evaluate the presence, intensity, and duration of mechanical sensory changes in AIS patients postoperatively.

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The influence of comorbidity on mortality in patients with epilepsy and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures.

This study aims to determine the contribution of comorbidly to excess PNES mortality.

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μ-opioid receptor agonist facilitates circulating tumor cell formation in bladder cancer via the MOR/AKT/Slug pathway: a comprehensive study including randomized controlled trial.

μ-opioid receptor agonists (MORAs) are indispensable for analgesia in bladder cancer (BC) patients, both during surgery and for chronic pain treatment. Whether MORAs affect BC progression and metastasis remains largely unknown. This study focused on the effects of MORAs on the formation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in BC and aimed to provide potential therapeutic targets, which would retain the pain-relieving effects of MORAs in BC patients without sacrificing their long-term prognosis.

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Clinical characteristics depending on magnetic resonance imaging patterns in idiopathic isolated optic neuritis.

To investigate differences in clinical features based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in idiopathic isolated optic neuritis patients. We retrospectively analyzed 68 eyes of 59 patients diagnosed with optic neuritis and showed inflammatory findings indicative of optic neuritis on MRI. We investigated clinical features, such as the presence of accompanying pain, visual acuity, and optic disc swelling. Optic disc swelling was classified as normal, mild, or severe. The MRI results were divided into intraorbital, intracanalicular, and whole optic nerve according to the lesion, and these were compared and analyzed with clinical features. The study included 29 men and 30 women, with a mean age of 42.6 ± 16.6 years. Among 59 patients, 48 (81.4%) complained of pain. Optic disc swelling was not observed in 48.5% of patients (33 eyes). Inflammatory changes were the most common in the intraorbital region (33 eyes), intracanalicular region (20 eyes), and the entire optic nerve (15 eyes). There was no statistical difference in the pain pattern according to the location of the lesion (p = .677), but when inflammation was present in the entire optic nerve, optic disc swelling was severe (p = .023). The initial and final visual acuity did not significantly correlate with the MRI pattern, presence of pain, or optic disc swelling (p = .156, p = .714, and p = .436). The MRI contrast enhancement pattern was associated with optic disc swelling but was not associated with pain or initial visual acuity. It should be noted that it is insufficient to judge the clinical features of optic neuritis based on MRI findings.

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Unmet Needs in Preventive Treatment of Migraine.

Migraine represents the most common cause of work disability in young women and the second one in the general population. Preventive treatment can reduce the frequency of attacks and their intensity, consequently improving the quality of life. Despite this, global health systems have shown important gaps in addressing optimal management of preventive therapy. Despite numerous adverse effects of traditional medications for migraine prevention being well known, these medications continue to be considered the standard of care for prophylaxis of this disease in many contexts. On the other hand, the widespread use of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists, which have marked a breakthrough in prophylactic therapy of migraine, has been limited because of their high cost. We also highlight important shortcomings in migraine management by general practitioners (GPs) and poor patient education on the disease with a consequent delay in referring selected patients to dedicated headache centres. Over the next few years, we expect the headache medicine community to mobilize to address these gaps in preventive treatment of migraine.

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Assessing the Self-reported After Events Following Immunization of COVID-19 Vaccines in Turkey and Bangladesh.

Though mass vaccination programs helped to reduce the severity of the ongoing pandemic, various unwanted effects were reported in Turkey and Bangladesh after taking vaccines. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the adverse effects of several vaccines in Turkey and Bangladesh and how the population of both countries prioritizes the continuation of vaccination compared to the side effects. An online survey with a pretest was conducted to gather data over the research period from July 10, 2021 to December 10, 2021. Finally, the questionnaire was shared with the mass population of Turkey and Bangladesh who have received at least one or two doses of the COVID-19 vaccines. The quality of the questionnaire was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha test. The study consisted of 1508 respondents from Bangladesh and 602 respondents from Turkey. Among the total 2110 respondents, 50.0% were male 66.8% were from the 18-30 years age range, and 77.5% reported living in the city area. Among all the respondents, 64.99% of those vaccinated in Bangladesh and 67.28% of those vaccinated in Turkey reported side effects after vaccinations. Participants receiving mRNA vaccines (Pfizer and Moderna) experienced the most side effects, with many reporting pain at the injection site in both nations. Following that, fever, body pain, and headache were common in Bangladesh, whereas body pain, fatigue, and arm numbness were common in Turkey. The study found no significant adverse events reported in Turkey and Bangladesh following the first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccination. These COVID-19 vaccines showed similar patterns of efficacy and safety during the short period of analysis. Vaccines from different manufacturers showed a non-significant level of adverse events during this binational AEFI approach to COVID-19 vaccines. More studies are recommended on the efficacy and safety of several vaccines to discover unexpected effects.

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