Messages Supporting the 2017 Global Year Against Pain After Surgery from IASP Chapters and Other Organizations

Please send your messages of support to globalyear@iasp-pain.org

From the American Pain Society

The American Pain Society recognizes 2017 as the “Global Year Against Pain After Surgery,” as designated by our parent organization the International Association for the Study of Pain. Millions of patients experience pain after surgery each year, and inadequate treatment can prolong postoperative suffering and disability and perhaps lead to chronic pain. Mechanisms of acute post-operative pain and its transition to persistent pain are two important areas of research highlighted in the NIH Federal Pain Research Strategy. As in the treatment of all pains, the American Pain Society encourages multidisciplinary treatment of pain after surgery, including multimodal pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches. 

From ChildKind International

ChildKind partners in support of the 2017 IASP Global Year Against Pain After Surgery. Pain after surgery represents an important consideration for surgical providers and patients around the world. This campaign is designed to disseminate information worldwide about pain after surgery. Help us raise awareness about this issue and encourage government leaders, health-care organizations, and other stakeholders to support policies that result in improved management of pain aftger surgery.

From the American Society for Pain Management Nursing

The American Society for Pain Management Nursing is pleased to support the International Association for the Study of Pain and the European Pain Federation in their recognition of 2017 as the Global Year Against Pain After Surgery. Pain is an expected outcome of surgery, yet to date approximately half of patients report inadequate postoperative pain control. The American Society for Pain Management Nursing’s mission is to advance and promote optimal nursing care for people affected by pain by promoting best nursing practices. The best way to accomplish this is to disseminate high-quality evidence-based guidelines that advise the use of multimodal analgesics and non-pharmacologic therapies. By partnering with other like-minded pain management professionals worldwide we can begin to improve quality and outcomes for managing pain after surgery for all patients.​

From the American Academy of Pain Medicine

The American Academy of Pain Medicine applauds the designation of 2017 as the Global Year Against Pain After Surgeryby the International Association for the Study of Pain, and the European Pain Federation. In many patients, acute postoperative pain is followed by short-term and long-term suffering and disability. Effective control of pain both soon and long after surgery improves patient outcomes and quality of life. For these reasons, acute pain has become a focus of research and clinical quality improvement worldwide and (in the United States) a medical fellowship subspecialty. AAPM members have worked on behalf of patients with acute and chronic pain after surgery, often as concurrent members of IASP and its Acute Pain Special Interest Group.

From the American Society of Anesthesiologists

It is encouraging that the Global Year Against Pain After Surgery initiative will promote better pain management through education and increased awareness. As millions of people undergo surgery each year, ASA is pleased IASP will be disseminating information worldwide about pain after surgery, mobilizing its members and forging partnerships with other professional and scientific organizations. (Excerpt of letter of support; read the entire letter here)

From the Irish Faculty of Pain Medicine

The Irish Faculty of Pain Medicine applauds the designation of 2017 as the Global Year Against Pain After Surgery by the International Association for the Study of Pain and the European Pain Federation. Pain after surgery is debilitating and may become chronic. The Irish Faculty of Pain Medicine considers the establishment of acute pain services to be a minimum standard of care, and acute pain training is now instituted into the core curriculum of the National Training Programme in Pain Medicine in Ireland.

From PAIN OUT

PAIN OUT supports the designation of 2017 as The Global Year Against Pain After Surgery by the International Association of the Study of Pain (IASP) and the European Pain Federation (EFIC).
Pain after surgery is prevalent in a high proportion of patients in high- and low-resource countries. PAIN OUT, as an international network of clinicians and researchers, works with health care providers treating surgical patients, to advance the quality of pain management and to promote clinical research. Efforts such as these should optimize practices so that outcomes reported by patients will become acceptable.