Eija Anneli Kalso, MD, DMedSci, (Finland), Past President

Eija Kalso

Professor of Pain Research and Management, University of Helsinki, Finland
Director of the Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine
Helsinki University Central Hospital
Helsinki, Finland

IASP Activities
IASP Member Since 1989
Councilor; Section Editor (PAIN); Chair of Committee on Committees, Nominations and Audit Committees, Member of numerous committees

Professional Background
Professor of Pain Research and Management, University of Helsinki, Finland, and Director of the Multidisciplinary Pain Clinic, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital. Her interests in the pain field include: opioid pharmacology; spinal mechanisms of neuropathic and inflammatory pain; clinical trials in chronic pain; acute and chronic postoperative pain; and pain, opioids, and cognition.

In 1983, Dr. Kalso received the Royal Society European Exchange Fellowship (Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford). In 1990, she was awarded the European Academy of Anaesthesiology Traveling Fellowship (Nuffield Department of Anaesthetics, University of Oxford; and Department of Pharmacology, University College London). In 2000, she was the Litchfield Lecturer without title (University of Oxford).

Dr. Kalso is interested in the mechanisms that make acute postoperative/traumatic pain persistent, including genetics and psychosocial factors, and how this process could be prevented. Pharmacology of opioids, from basic mechanisms to clinical efficacy, has been one of her long-term interests with ramifications to the alpha-2-adrenergic system and COMT. A major challenge is the development of pharmacological functional brain imaging to study drug effects in patients with chronic pain. Recently, she has also tried to understand why some patients have recurring HSV infections and hemibody pain and how that pain can be managed more effectively.

Additionally, Dr. Kalso seeks to better understand why cancer pain is not adequately managed.

Disclosures
None